Tag: racial profiling

America’s criminal justice problem

America’s criminal justice problem

| September 23, 2014

By Lee A. Daniels NNPA Columnist Do you know what little respect black and Hispanic citizens of New York City have for following the rules that make living in the city bearable– or not “loitering,” or riding their bicycles on the sidewalk, or spitting on the street, or walking through parks after dark, or–my particular […]

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I Was Racially Profiled in My Own Driveway – Doug Glanville – The Atlantic

I Was Racially Profiled in My Own Driveway – Doug Glanville – The Atlantic

| April 18, 2014

We’ve heard folks from “different” cultures say they’re tired of black folks being so easily offended. Well, if someone steps on your toe, of course it’s easy for someone on the sidelines to say, “I don’t get it. It doesn’t hurt me.” The nation has come a long way in some regards when talking about […]

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Father, daughters live Black Friday nightmare police stop

Father, daughters live Black Friday nightmare police stop

| January 23, 2014

Jerrion Turner and his two oldest daughters witnessed an altercation take place then later were accused of involvement with the same incident.

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New York’s ‘stop-and-frisk’ policy declared unconstitutional

New York’s ‘stop-and-frisk’ policy declared unconstitutional

| August 28, 2013

The stop-and-frisk policy practiced by the New York City police department was little more than “indirect racial profiling,” according to a federal judge who ruled that police routinely violated the 4th and 14th amendment rights of blacks and Latinos.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg scoffed at the ruling, saying, “This is a very dangerous decision made by a judge who I think does not understand how policing works.”

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A retrograde Supreme Court

| August 13, 2013

By Lee A. Daniels—No matter how much some commentators try to spin the not guilty verdict of George Zimmerman as an example that the legal system worked properly, the freeing of Trayvon Martin’s killer actually underscores multiple bitter truths. One is that for black Americans, “the law” has more often been predator than protector.

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