Tag: black history

The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro

The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro

| July 2, 2013

By Frederick Douglass—A speech given at Rochester, New York, July 5, 1852—”What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim…There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of the United States, at this very hour.”

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Video interview with Richard Stevenson, Velvet Brooks and Archie Smith

Video interview with Richard Stevenson, Velvet Brooks and Archie Smith

| June 14, 2013

Eric Hackley talks with Wayne Township Trustee Richard Stevenson, retired FWCS Educator Velvet Brooks and retired laborer Archie Smith. All three graduated Central High School during the Civil Rights Movement and during the time of the March on Washington and went on to be successful in their respective careers.

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Queens recite immortal words at King event

Queens recite immortal words at King event

| June 11, 2013

Among those on hand to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech in Fort Wayne and to welcome his nephew, minister and educator Dr. Derek King to the city, was the Queens African-American Literature and Art Club (Queens) Inc. Members of the group gave dramatic presentations of some of history’s great women liberators, including Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman and Mary McLeod Bethune.

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A 150-year history message: What if courage had been lacking?

| June 11, 2013

By Dr. Clifford F. Buttram Jr.—Recently, I attended the University of Saint Francis’ 50th Anniversary celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s. address at the former Scottish Rite. During the luncheon events, Dr. King’s nephew, Dr. Derek King, spoke about three ills that continue to affect the African American community: poverty, ignorance and in equality. Interestingly, these three issues have not fundamentally changed for the black community since Dr. King’s 1963 visit nor do they appear to even be relevant to many people in 2013. Why? Because to not adequately address poverty (from a local, state, and national level) underscores and validates multiple levels of ignorance within factions of our society which ultimately, and negatively, affect the equality that was battled for over the past 150 years. History is made every minute, but we live it through the past.

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Interview with Brother Nuri Muhammad, student minister of the Honorable Louis Farrakhan

Interview with Brother Nuri Muhammad, student minister of the Honorable Louis Farrakhan

| June 5, 2013

THE HACKLEY REPORT By Eric Donald Hackley—Willie Lynch may have given his speech in Virginia, but his descendants live in Fort Wayne. My question is, in the Willie Lynch letter, it talks about how if the slave mentality isn’t corrected within the first 300 years, it will become perpetual. It has now been 301 years, what’s the verdict?

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Historic King speech anchoring USF’s ‘Future of Education’ presentations

Historic King speech anchoring USF’s ‘Future of Education’ presentations

| May 24, 2013

FORT WAYNE—The nephew of perhaps the world’s greatest civil and human rights icon is slated to kick off a landmark event early next week. On June 5, the University of St. Francis is scheduled to host a series of gatherings designed to highlight the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s views on education and how they can be used to shape today’s world.

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South Africa’s best kept secret

By George E. Curry, NNPA Columnist—When Nelson Mandela and his African National Congress comrades were plotting to overthrow the white minority-rule apartheid regime in South Africa, Lilies Farm in Rivonia, just north of Johannesburg, served as their secret hideout.

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Home-going tribute for Brother George Smith

| May 15, 2013

By the Rev. Bill McGill | We have come to celebrate the life and legacy of a great man, who used his entire existence as an agent in God’s divine plan. He worked literally until his day was done and everyone will agree that his victory was won. He fought a good fight and his faith never took flight, because he had a deep abiding commitment to do what was pleasing in God’s sight.

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Reflecting on the Life and Legacy of George A. Smith Jr.

| May 15, 2013

Courtesy of the Martin Luther King (MLK) Jr., Club | George Smith began his work as a civil rights activist at an early age in Meridian, Miss., where he born. In Meridian, George experienced and witnessed many injustices against blacks and made civil rights activism his lifelong crusade.

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George Smith: A hero for all people

| May 15, 2013

By Larry Lee | Long-time Fort Wayne resident George Smith died Monday, April 29 at age 69. What made Smith’s life so noteworthy did not play out during his last 46 years, when he lived here. That occurred during the three tumultuous years immediately before his moving to town from Meridian, Miss.

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