Tag: black history

Lee Daniels’ The Butler brought back memories and a few tears

Lee Daniels’ The Butler brought back memories and a few tears

| September 1, 2013

By Madeline Marcelia Garvin On Aug. 16, Lee Daniels’s The Butler, opened in Fort Wayne. The film is very powerful and features an all star cast: Forest Whitaker, Oprah Winfrey, Robin Williams, Jane Fonda, Mariah Carey, Cuba Gooding, Jr., John Cusack and Terrence Howard to name a few. True, there were some stereotypical moments: the […]

Read More

March on Washington: Then & now

March on Washington: Then & now

| August 29, 2013

By Norman and Velma Murphy Hill—Fifty years ago, 250,000 people gathered at the Lincoln Memorial to call for justice and equality for all Americans. As the anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom approaches, we, participants in the march we helped to plan, are delighted that this remarkable moment will be commemorated.

Read More

Race in America: Deconstructing Reconstruction

| August 10, 2013

  The tumultuous decade that followed the Civil War failed to enshrine Black voting and civil rights, and instead paved the way for more than a century of entrenched racial injustice. By Nicholas Lemann Children in elementary school often come home with the idea that the purpose of the Civil War was to end slavery-but […]

Read More

Picnic Perspectives: Interview with Rick Stevenson Jr.

Picnic Perspectives: Interview with Rick Stevenson Jr.

| July 15, 2013

To make a long story short, we have been taught a system of fear and intimidation from the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade and the different mechanisms and psychological methods that were perpetuated on us during our sojourn to America. This has been an ongoing theme from generation to generation where we fear the loss of a job, position or title in order to have things. We sacrifice what is in the best interest of us as a people for us to be really free and have the same equal rights and mandates of other people.

Read More

Picnic Perspectives: Interview with James Redmond

| July 12, 2013

Eric Hackley: You have been consistently saying that blacks need to pull together, speak out and express themselves. Over the years have we made any progress in that capacity? James Redmond: No! Perhaps, very minute. Very few people will speak out and I don’t know why that is. Some are afraid of screwing up their jobs and livelihood. Even when you have a job, you should speak out when right is right and wrong is wrong.

Read More

The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro

The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro

| July 2, 2013

By Frederick Douglass—A speech given at Rochester, New York, July 5, 1852—”What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim…There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of the United States, at this very hour.”

Read More

Video interview with Richard Stevenson, Velvet Brooks and Archie Smith

Video interview with Richard Stevenson, Velvet Brooks and Archie Smith

| June 14, 2013

Eric Hackley talks with Wayne Township Trustee Richard Stevenson, retired FWCS Educator Velvet Brooks and retired laborer Archie Smith. All three graduated Central High School during the Civil Rights Movement and during the time of the March on Washington and went on to be successful in their respective careers.

Read More

Queens recite immortal words at King event

Queens recite immortal words at King event

| June 11, 2013

Among those on hand to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech in Fort Wayne and to welcome his nephew, minister and educator Dr. Derek King to the city, was the Queens African-American Literature and Art Club (Queens) Inc. Members of the group gave dramatic presentations of some of history’s great women liberators, including Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman and Mary McLeod Bethune.

Read More

A 150-year history message: What if courage had been lacking?

| June 11, 2013

By Dr. Clifford F. Buttram Jr.—Recently, I attended the University of Saint Francis’ 50th Anniversary celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s. address at the former Scottish Rite. During the luncheon events, Dr. King’s nephew, Dr. Derek King, spoke about three ills that continue to affect the African American community: poverty, ignorance and in equality. Interestingly, these three issues have not fundamentally changed for the black community since Dr. King’s 1963 visit nor do they appear to even be relevant to many people in 2013. Why? Because to not adequately address poverty (from a local, state, and national level) underscores and validates multiple levels of ignorance within factions of our society which ultimately, and negatively, affect the equality that was battled for over the past 150 years. History is made every minute, but we live it through the past.

Read More

Interview with Brother Nuri Muhammad, student minister of the Honorable Louis Farrakhan

Interview with Brother Nuri Muhammad, student minister of the Honorable Louis Farrakhan

| June 5, 2013

THE HACKLEY REPORT By Eric Donald Hackley—Willie Lynch may have given his speech in Virginia, but his descendants live in Fort Wayne. My question is, in the Willie Lynch letter, it talks about how if the slave mentality isn’t corrected within the first 300 years, it will become perpetual. It has now been 301 years, what’s the verdict?

Read More