Tag: black history

Minister seeks to form local African American Historical District

| November 1, 2013

“Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.”—Exodus 20:12 FORT WAYNE—While others debate the placement of monuments to participants in some of the city’s bloodiest history, one local spiritual and civil rights leader wants the community to focus their attention on […]

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Jazz brunch honors ‘Colored Women’s Clubs’ history

Jazz brunch honors ‘Colored Women’s Clubs’ history

| September 11, 2013

FORT WAYNE—The Annual Jazz Brunch, sponsored by the Jr. Lillian Jones Brown Culture Club, raises scholarship funds  for youth. The annual event celebrates and honors the treasured legacy of African American women’s clubs of Fort Wayne. One of the presenters for this year’s event was Marsha Smiley, whose article “The History of Early Colored Women’s […]

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Fort Wayne HIS-Story reform

| September 10, 2013

THE HACKLEY REPORT by Eric Donald Hackley The only state of politicians better at re-writing history than those in Texas are those located in Indiana. Texas has only totally reframed slavery, equating it with being an unpaid intern. Indiana on the other hand, has literally deleted Indians from Indiana history and out of Indiana public […]

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50 years later: What are we really doing?

50 years later: What are we really doing?

| September 10, 2013

Author of ‘King—The Dream Revisited’ revisits work 20 years after debut By Minister Servant LeRoy Page Special to Frost Illustrated After reading several newspaper articles and watching station after station of TV news reports concerning black on black crime and violence 20 years ago, I thought “What would Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm […]

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Lee Daniels’ The Butler brought back memories and a few tears

Lee Daniels’ The Butler brought back memories and a few tears

| September 1, 2013

By Madeline Marcelia Garvin On Aug. 16, Lee Daniels’s The Butler, opened in Fort Wayne. The film is very powerful and features an all star cast: Forest Whitaker, Oprah Winfrey, Robin Williams, Jane Fonda, Mariah Carey, Cuba Gooding, Jr., John Cusack and Terrence Howard to name a few. True, there were some stereotypical moments: the […]

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March on Washington: Then & now

March on Washington: Then & now

| August 29, 2013

By Norman and Velma Murphy Hill—Fifty years ago, 250,000 people gathered at the Lincoln Memorial to call for justice and equality for all Americans. As the anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom approaches, we, participants in the march we helped to plan, are delighted that this remarkable moment will be commemorated.

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Race in America: Deconstructing Reconstruction

| August 10, 2013

  The tumultuous decade that followed the Civil War failed to enshrine Black voting and civil rights, and instead paved the way for more than a century of entrenched racial injustice. By Nicholas Lemann Children in elementary school often come home with the idea that the purpose of the Civil War was to end slavery-but […]

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Picnic Perspectives: Interview with Rick Stevenson Jr.

Picnic Perspectives: Interview with Rick Stevenson Jr.

| July 15, 2013

To make a long story short, we have been taught a system of fear and intimidation from the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade and the different mechanisms and psychological methods that were perpetuated on us during our sojourn to America. This has been an ongoing theme from generation to generation where we fear the loss of a job, position or title in order to have things. We sacrifice what is in the best interest of us as a people for us to be really free and have the same equal rights and mandates of other people.

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Picnic Perspectives: Interview with James Redmond

| July 12, 2013

Eric Hackley: You have been consistently saying that blacks need to pull together, speak out and express themselves. Over the years have we made any progress in that capacity? James Redmond: No! Perhaps, very minute. Very few people will speak out and I don’t know why that is. Some are afraid of screwing up their jobs and livelihood. Even when you have a job, you should speak out when right is right and wrong is wrong.

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The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro

The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro

| July 2, 2013

By Frederick Douglass—A speech given at Rochester, New York, July 5, 1852—”What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim…There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of the United States, at this very hour.”

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