Opinion

We need to use our black economic power

We need to use our black economic power

| December 21, 2014

By Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu Courtesy of National News Releases How can a group have more than three million people with college degrees be so under-developed economically? How can a people have more than 10,000 elected officials have so little economic power? Why do African Americans only spend three percent of their income with each other? […]

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Dr. Ruby Cain of It Is Well With My Soul remarks on Journey for Justice

| December 17, 2014

Organization to organize joint sessions with community, police Our Journey for Justice can mark a new beginning. We represent different cultures and have different experiences. Yet, we are united on the theme of safe neighborhoods, quality education for youth, gainful employment, and acquisition of wealth that we can pass on to our descendants. We may […]

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Still looking for change

Still looking for change

| December 16, 2014

By James Clingman NNPA Columnist As the end of another tumultuous year approaches, black people again find ourselves in the relative same economic and political position as we were the year before, and the years preceding.  In 2007, leading up to 2008, when the ultimate level of political history had finally come to fruition, black […]

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Beginning of Journey for Justice

Beginning of Journey for Justice

| December 16, 2014

By Tony Young Civil Rights Committee UAW Local 2209 Special to Frost Illustrated For most Americans the story, of how labor organizations like the UAW were key partners in the Civil Rights movement of the mid-20th century is an unknown piece of trivia. From the UAW’s support of the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955, which […]

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Police shooting victims lives worth less than ham sandwich

Police shooting victims lives worth less than ham sandwich

| December 16, 2014

The archaic grand jury system By George E. Curry NNPA Columnist In Tom Wolfe’s best-selling The Bonfire of the Vanities, New York State Chief Judge Sol Wachtler famously said “a grand jury would indict a ham sandwich, if that’s what you wanted.” Given the recent failure of grand juries to indict Darren Wilson, a white […]

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Blacks, browns seen as savages

Blacks, browns seen as savages

| December 15, 2014

By Bill Fletcher Jr. NNPA Columnist An African American friend of mine keeps asking, in utter amazement, how it is not obvious that there was something wrong when Officer Wilson fired 13 shots at an unarmed Michael Brown.  As she has said:  “Brown was unarmed! How can you justify shooting him at all, let alone […]

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‘A Litany For Those Who Aren’t Ready For Healing’

‘A Litany For Those Who Aren’t Ready For Healing’

| December 15, 2014

By the Rev. Dr. Yolanda Pierce Let us not rush to the language of healing, before understanding the fullness of the injury and the depth of the wound. Let us not rush to offer a band-aid, when the gaping wound requires surgery and complete reconstruction. Let us not offer false equivalencies, thereby diminishing the particular […]

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A license to kill black men

A license to kill black men

| December 15, 2014

By Lee A. Daniels NNPA Columnist From nearly the moment he was attacked by a New York City police officer July 18, the world has, via that chilling video, watched Eric Garner die. Are we now about to see the “traditions” that led to his death and—thus far—have enabled his killer to escape justice die, […]

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The Christmas creep

The Christmas creep

| December 11, 2014

By Julianne Malveaux NNPA Columnist Did you notice that some stores are already touting Christmas sales? They are encouraging people to start buying for Christmas now. We’ve been experiencing this “Christmas creep” for years. Some of us are reluctant to call it “Christmas Creep” because there is no Christ or Christianity in the profligate spending […]

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Same old problem, same old response

Same old problem, same old response

| December 10, 2014

By Lauren Victoria Burke NNPA Columnist In 1983, it was Michael Stewart, 25. He was a graffiti artist who was beaten to death in police custody in New York.  No one paid a price for his death. On the day of Stewart’s arrest, the Committee Against Racially Motivated Police Violence was holding a news conference. […]

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