Spotlight on April Wright of Northeast Indiana Urban Outreach (part one of two)

| August 27, 2014
Jeanie Summerville

Jeanie Summerville

By Jeanie Summerville What’s up babies? I hope, that all is still well with you and yours and that, you’re still taking time out of your days to bring yourselves and others some well deserved beauty, joy, happiness and some form of peace of mind as we travel on our journey of love to get to know one another better. On that note, it pleases me so to bring to you this week’s spotlight which is in a two-part format—because, there’s so much that our young adults need to know pertaining to this subject. And, I want to do my part making sure that you receive all this information because then you’ll know, you have a choice. Maybe, it will put some of your minds at ease when it comes to the decision making. So at this time, all we want you to do is just sit back, relax and be informed because Frost Illustrated is gonna take you there. Our Spotlight’s topic is: Are more blacks adopting children or aborting children? This is what she has to say:

April, Autumn and Wayne Wright. (Courtesy photo)

April, Autumn and Wayne Wright. (Courtesy photo)

“Hello, Frost Illustrated readers. My name is April Wright and I recently moved to Fort Wayne from Chicago and I became a board member with the Northeast Indiana Urban Outreach Organization because it’s purpose is to educate about pro-life, bring about healing to post-abortive women and become more involved within the black community. Our director is Krista (Vickie) Walker and we’re located at 2126 Inwood Drive, and now I’m going to share with you my story. “As a 36 year old, devoted wife and mother, I feel compelled to tell the world my journey thus far. While growing up in a single-parent household in the innercity of Chicago, I was always empowered through my mom’s example to excel in my academics, attend college and become independent. I love my mom and embrace my families upbringing, traditions and values of church and ‘sticking together’ as family. However, there was one major disadvantage for me as an African American teenager going through puberty—the lack of value of waiting until marriage to have sex. “As a 14 year old, I can recall my mom and other influential people in my life (i.e. aunts, godmothers) saying, ‘Don’t have sex or you’ll get pregnant! And, If you get pregnant, you’re getting kicked out of the house!’ Fear was ultimately the driving force for not getting pregnant. So when I became a, daredevil, having sex was just one more risk I was willing to take. At age 16, to my shame, I got pregnant. My fears were now a reality. I knew of no other path to take because I believed for myself that I was too young to be a mom and I didn’t want to be on the next talk show titled, ‘Who’s the baby’s daddy?’ “I aborted my unborn child of eight weeks and I recall feeling really empty, lost and afraid to ever tell someone what I did. I was unaware of other parenting options when I went to the clinic to confirm my pregnancy. Actually, until recently, I didn’t understand fully the development of my baby. In May 2014, after participating in a post-abortion Bible study group, I realized that the miracle of life had already begun and at eight weeks my unborn child was actually not just a lump tissue, but a fetus that had toes, eyes, fingers, a brain, a heart and etc. Who’s to blame for my decision to abort? Of course, myself. “However, as I have become aware of one of the biggest crises in our communities, my hope is that with these facts listed below, you as a reader would decide the reason why there aren’t more African Americans giving back to their community through adoption. And, also consider becoming an advocate of pro-life organizations within our community and nation. Listed here is some information that you need to know: “• 8,206 homicides are committed in the black community annually (http//:www.radiancefoundation.org). “• 363,705 abortions occur annually in the black community (http//:www.radiancefoundation.org). “• 1,876 black babies are aborted every day in the US http//:www.blackgenocide,org,2012). “• Black women are more than fives times as likely as white women to abort (www.guttmacher.org). “• In 2008, black women had the highest unintended pregnancy rate of any racial or ethnic group. (Finer LB and Zola MR, Shifts in intended and unintended pregnancies in the United States, 2001–2008, American Journal of Public Health, 2014, 104(S1): S44-S48.) “• In the state of Indiana 21 percent  (327 of 1558) of adoptions were black children—Oct. 2010-Sept. 2011 (www.nbcsl.org National Black Caucus of State Legislators). “• The most common to be adopted in the U.S. are children from China, with Russian children being the second largest group. (http://wikipedia.statistics -interracial-adoption)  “I believe where there are more opportunities to educate and inspire the various parenting options to a teenager or woman facing an unplanned pregnancy, there will be a tremendous decrease in the abortions. “Here in Fort Wayne, I have been blessed to find several programs that are impacting our communities by offering Pro-Life education, Women’s health classes, support groups, spiritual guidance, sexual integrity education, parenting classes, prenatal education and adoption resources. Two programs in particular which have personally impacted me are: “• A Hope Center (www.ahopecenter.org). “• Urban Outreach (neiurbanoutreach@gmail.com). “• Fort Wayne Church of Christ. “Isn’t it interesting that the word Abortion & Adoption, seem so similar? “Adoption gives life and a future “Abortion ends life “Adoption gives hopes and dreams “Abortion leaves regrets “Adoption is a tough decision but biblical “Abortion is a tough decision, but non-biblical “Through God’s redemption, I became a born-again Christian 15 years ago. After seven years of an incredible and adventurous marriage, my husband and I adopted our beautiful baby girl as an infant. Her birth-mom personally chose us through a private adoption agency. In our eyes, her birth-mom, is our hero and we’ll always esteem her as an African American and my desire is to enlighten more couples to seek adoption. There are wonderful babies here in the State of Indiana and the United States that need your nurturing and loving embrace. Let’s strive to take care of our own black heritage, especially if you are financially, emotionally and spiritually capable of adopting.” Now in closing I say, I’m so proud of you April for sharing with us your story and I know that you’ll definitely be an asset to the cause. So until next week, when part two comes to you and you’ll meet the Director, Kristy Walker and Board Member Kayvonne Dailey, you’ve been Up Close with Jeanie. Bye, bye babies. P.S. If you would like the Spotlight shined upon you or someone you know, all in the name of love, just send me an e-mail to upclosewithjeanie@yahoo.com. I’d love to hear from ya.

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Category: Local, National, Spiritual Matters

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