Anger feeds prison, cemetery

| October 31, 2013
prison cemetery

Prison cemeteries, such as the one pictured for Moundsville Penitentiary (West Virginia), are usually the final resting places for inmates who die or are executed in prison and whose remains are unclaimed or refused by family members. (Photo: Angie/Flickr)

By Foundation One
Special to Frost Illustrated

Having answers for anger we see in our three-year-olds is a start to helping to stop crimes “that happen” when they get older. Psychiatrists say anger—which leads to depression in children—is real. Recognizing the warning sign in our children early can help save lives.

Some children, in virtually all classrooms, have a serious emotional problem. Many will end up behind bars because Indiana has no other way to deal with them.

The No Child Left Behind Act, enacted in 2002, was supposed to make sure all students—particularly those at risk—are meeting minimal standards by 2014. I looked in the dictionary for the meaning of minimal—the least quality or amount possible allowed by law. That’s the same game FWCS had in 1983. I was ranked 274th out of a class of 301. I got left behind because I did not know how important education was. Also, some teachers did not care. They didn’t know how to reach me, so I spent time in the Old Wood Youth Center when I was 15 to 16 years old. With the county spending $30.5 million on the juvenile center, it has room for the next generation.

Looking back 34 years later, I did not want anybody telling me I could not see my family and friends. I did not realize what, I was doing to mother, family and community. I gave myself to choice: I had to change my behavior. Jail, prison or the graveyard was waiting on me.

Foundation One (fourth from right) stands in front of a custom made casket with a doll in it with a group of men at a recent presentation at Jerusalem Baptist Church regarding working to stop violence in the community. Foundation One said he had a local elder build the casket to help demonstrate graphically the fate that was waiting for young people if the community does not work to help them deal with anger issues and to help people who have lost loved ones to violence deal with the loss. (Courtesy photo)

Foundation One (fourth from right) stands in front of a custom made casket with a doll in it with a group of men at a recent presentation at Jerusalem Baptist Church regarding working to stop violence in the community. Foundation One said he had a local elder build the casket to help demonstrate graphically the fate that was waiting for young people if the community does not work to help them deal with anger issues and to help people who have lost loved ones to violence deal with the loss. (Courtesy photo)

Prosecutor Karen Richards:

“If the officer tells you several times to put your gun down and you do not, you are going to get killed—end of story,” meaning no one is going to prison for your murder.”

Young brothers, it’s time to put the guns down and pick up a trade that will you to take care of and grow old in the community with your family. The prison superintendent of Indiana, Cecil David, said he personally, morally and religiously does not have any reservations about execution, even though it’s difficult, which means, if you kill someone and get caught and found guilty, brother, you will get no compassion from the State of Indiana. You must die! Please, ask yourself: “Is my crime worth the time?”

The price for not changing your behavior can mean being locked up. Think of all these whom you are going to read about, wishing and thinking deep inside that they had a second chance at freedom. I know and love all four of these brothers who all have mothers and family who miss them:

• Darrick Pinkston, sentenced to 115 years for his crimes;

• Sharico D. Blakely, sentenced to 100 years for his crimes (reduced to 60 years);

• Anthony Parish, sentenced to 176 years for his crimes, and

• Dontay Martin, sentenced to 170 years for his crimes.

Michigan City Cemetery will bury so many of my brothers; the cemetery that has no name on it will bury so many of my brothers. Friends and family can visit the cemetery, but rarely do. Please, talk to someone about your anger. It will help save your life and save you from being buried in the prison cemetery that was opened in 1860.

Conclusion

I’m thankful to have gotten over my fears of not thinking I could go to college. I am currently enrolled in Indiana Tech, majoring in psychology, learning how the mind functions, plus how people are supposed to help. The enemy and the prison system benefits from you not being a productive member of the free world.

It’s been time to revalue, weigh our homes, church, schools and prisons. Let’s deal with our babies who are not developing into what our community needs. They did not come into this world on their own. They did not slip through the cracks on their own. We helped them by not helping them.

The whole community is needed to save the next generation. It could be your child who needs help. Are we doing our best or has fear taken over?

Peace.

Tags: , , , , ,

Category: Crime & Safety, Local, Opinion

Comments are closed.